Immigration officials work through MLK holiday to break up family

Jorge Garcia deported, bids goodbye to wife, children

The battle to keep the Garcia family together ended early Monday morning at Detroit Metropolitan airport as Jorge Garcia complied with an deportation order. This, despite the national holiday commemorating civil rights icon, Martin Luther King Jr. and movement on congress for immigration reform to codify Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Recent comments about Haitians on the anniversary of the earthquake that struck the island have compelled the President to respond to charges of racism during the King holiday.

Jorge has been a Detroit resident for 30 years since his family brought him here at the age of 10. He was just 2 years too old to qualify for DACA, but has been a exemplary member of his community on a rollercoaster like odyssey to stay here. President Trump has asked for, and received a bipartisan plan to protect “Dreamers” protected by DACA and for comprehensive immigration reform that might help Jorge. Trump’s rejection of a clean Dream Act could scuttle hopes for passage of the federal budget, resulting in a painful government shutdown.

Garcia 3Jorge’s wife, Cindy was told he wouldn’t be allowed to return home for a decade. Still, she keeps hope alive that they will not be separated that long. “We’re going to pray and get him back fast, faster than this paperwork that gave him a 10 year bar.”

Cindy thanked every who got up before dawn to give much needed support, friends, activists and her union brothers and sisters. “I don’t see the justice in this.” said AJ Freer of UAW 600. “For a man who cares deeply and supports his family, obeys the law, pays taxes and has a history of helping others, I think ICE and the Federal Government of the United States acted cruelly to this family.” Bruised but unbowed, Freer vowed “Now we fight to get him back.”

Immigrant rights advocates speak out for laborers killed in fire

Tragedy in Novi only highlights injustice nationwide

District Judge Marianne Battani’s decision last Thursday not to hold a Novi man responsible for the deaths of five young men has immigrant rights advocates outraged. The Mexican laborers, aged 16-23, were living in Roger Tam’s basement when a fire broke out, killing them all. Judge Battani sentenced Tam to 9 months in jail for hiring the men but refused to punish him for the circumstances leading to their deaths. At a press conference Tuesday outside the Levin Federal Courthouse, representatives of LaSED, NAACP, the Congress of Communities and Michigan United pointed to the incident and outcome as evidence of a system that forces millions to live and work in abject conditions while not holding accountable those responsible.

Mary Carmen headshot 3“Sadly, this is not an isolated incident.” said Mary Carmen Munoz of LaSED. “Undocumented immigrants are being exploited and abused all across the country and the perpetrators are not being held accountable. “

SAM_1645The coalition is calling for safe working and living conditions, and a livable wage for all workers whether they are immigrant, American or undocumented. ““How sad is it that the lives of these five young people could be marginalized?” Said Donnell R. White, Executive Director of the Detroit Branch of the NAACP. “Today, we call on our justices and elected officials to move legislation to prevent this from happening again and to hold those responsible to the letter of the law when it does. Today we are united as one community and one voice.”

“We will not accept hateful and divisive politics that spread fear and lies about our immigrant families.” Said Consuela Lopez, Congress of Communities. “We want real protections for all workers Americans and immigrants alike.”

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32 Senate Democrats Vote Against Budget Resolution Without DREAM Act

Where Were Senators Peters & Stabenow?

On Thursday night, Republican leadership proposed a stop-gap spending measure that would keep the government funded into the new year, but it did not include the DREAM Act, legislation that would codify protections for immigrant youth once offered by the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) Program.  The continuing budget resolution passed along party lines with a 66-32 vote.

Immigrants rights advocates have loudly called for Senators not to vote for any budget measure that leaves out the DREAM Act, and 32 Democrats stood with them. Most notably, Michigan Senators Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow were not among them.

Every day, 122 immigrant youth lose their DACA protections and become eligible for deportation. Allies of immigrant youth need to be courageous and refuse to allow Republicans to move forward without providing immediate relief.

On January 22nd, the budget will again be up for a vote. Senators Stabenow and Peters will have another opportunity to do the right thing. A vote for the budget without the DREAM Act is a vote to leave immigrant youth out in the cold yet again. We at Michigan United would find that wholly unacceptable.

Immigrant Advocates to Michigan Senators: Vote No on Budget Measures Unless They Include DREAM Act

Protecting immigrant families a moral imperative in national priorities

On a telephonic press briefing today, Michigan immigrant rights advocates called on their US Senators not to come home without needed protections for their immigrant youth. A vote on a continuing resolution to fund the government is expected today. Advocates called on Senators Stabenow and Peters to vote no on any budget measure that does not include the DREAM Act. The continuing resolution, and the budget, will require Democratic votes to pass, and advocates believe that our Senators should demand the DREAM Act in return.

The briefing was conducted by:

Rev. Paul Perez, Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church
Freddy Polanco, Political Director, SEIU Michigan
State Representative Stephanie Chang
Juan Gonzalez, Detroit resident & DACA recipient
Oscar Castaneda, ACTION Lansing
Richard Kessler, West Michigan Coalition for Immigration Reform

A recording of the event is available at: https://soundcloud.com/michiganunited/dreamchip-tele-press-conference#t=0:00

“I was so proud when our community won DACA. My office has helped dozens of young people apply– I could see their horizons open up, and their fears slip away, all with just a simple piece of paper.” said State Rep. Stephanie Chang. “ We should not accept a budget, or a continuing resolution, that does not reflect our values. We are urging our allies to vote no until the budget measures up.”

“The Trump Administration’s revocation of DACA has thrown the lives of younger immigrants into chaos.” said Richard Kessler, President, West Michigan Coalition for Immigration Reform. “Every day, 122 more of them lose this protected status and find they are no longer allowed them to work, pursue their education or serve in the military. We need our allies to have courage NOW, and vote no on any budget or continuing resolution without relief for immigrant youth.”

Immigrant Rights Leaders to Demand Michigan Senators Include DREAM Act in Budget

Telephone press conference sites moral imperative to save immigrant families

MICHIGAN – Thursday afternoon, leaders from the immigrant rights community will hold a telephone press conference to demand that the Senate, including Democrats, include the DREAM Act.

The lives of younger immigrants in particular have been thrown into chaos with the Trump Administration’s revocation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). That Obama-era action protected younger immigrants from deportation and allowed them to work, own businesses, pursue their education and serve in the military. 

The votes of Michigan Senators are being needed to pass the budget. Our Senators should demand the inclusion of the DREAM Act  as a condition of their votes.

WHAT:

Telephone Press Conference: Democrats Stand up for Immigrant Families with DREAM Act

WHO:

Rev. Paul Perez, Director, Office of Mission and Justice, Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church

State Representative Stephanie Chang

Freddy Polanco, Director, SEIU Health Care Michigan

Richard Kessler, President, West Michigan Coalition for Immigration Reform

Oscar Castaneda, organizer, ACTION of Greater Lansing

Farah, Erzouki, Public Health Coordinator, ACCESS

WHEN:

Thursday, December 21, 12:15 p.m.

Where:

Contact Erik Shelley, 248-982-6326  erik@miunited.org for dial in number.

Officials, leaders, SNAP recipients outraged at cuts to program

Pending tax reform would deny children affordable, nutritional diet

As Congress rushes to pass a massive tax bill that gives billions to the large corporations and the wealthy, adding more than $1.4 trillion to the federal debt over 10 years in the process, local leaders and parents stood up to sound the alarm on how the tax bill will affect SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)  with massive cuts in funding.

In the Panel Discussion and Open Mic, State Representative Stephanie Chang (6-Detroit) encouraged SNAP recipients to speak about how the loss of SNAP will affect their lives.

Describing her experience while working as a student intern toward her degree as a Dietitian/Nutritionist, Shayna Danto explained, “As a student intern I was working full time but receiving no income, SNAP allowed me to eat. While using my SNAP benefits I  also discovered that the Program provided provisions to make greater use of SNAP while supporting the Detroit farming community. If a SNAP recipient buys food from a local grower the benefits are doubled. This is a double win. The local farming community benefits, and SNAP recipients eat healthy nutritious food.”

Mother of four and cancer survivor, Latasha Greer described her feelings. “ With Congress rushing to pass this cruel and inhumane bill, the reality of the SNAP Program being deeply cut petrifies me. In 2015, I was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer. The treatments to cure my cancer left me so weak and sick that working was completely impossible. Our family of six was left to rely on only one paycheck. This is an impossible situation. We desperately need the SNAP Program to feed our family.”

Close to 70 percent of SNAP participants are in families with children, more than one-quarter are in households with seniors or people with disabilities. If a parent loses her job or has a job that pays low wages, SNAP can help her feed her children until she is able to improve her circumstances. 93 percent of federal SNAP spending is for food.

Millions of Americans work in jobs with low wages, unpredictable schedules and no benefits such as paid sick leave, all of which contribute to high turnover and spells of unemployment.  SNAP provides monthly benefits that help fill the gaps for workers with low and inconsistent pay and can help workers weather periods without a job.  Workers who participate in SNAP most commonly work in service occupations, such as cooks or home health aides, or sales occupations, such as cashiers, which are often jobs with low pay and income volatility.

SNAP is heavily focused on the poor. 92 percent of SNAP benefits go to households with incomes at or below the poverty line, and 57 percent go to households at or below half of the poverty line (about $10,210 for a family of three in 2017).

Pontiac Councilman Kermit Williams also expressed outrage at the proposed restrictions to the program that provides important nutritional support for low-wage working families, low-income seniors, and people with disabilities living on fixed incomes.

Be part of the National march on Washington for a clean DREAM act.

Come with us to Washington DC as we march for the DREAM Act and urge Congress to include it in the budget on December 6th. The budget must pass by December, 8 in order to avoid a government shutdown. Therefore, we must make sure that the budget includes a clean DREAM Act. This march is our last chance to ensure that a clean DREAM Act is included in the budget.

Space is limited. Click HERE to register now.

Buses depart the afternoon of Tuesday, December, 5 and return on the morning of Thursday December, 7. We have delegations leaving from Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and Detroit. Click here to save your seat on the bus

Michigan United applauds nomination of Lawrence Garcia as Detroit’s next Corporation Counsel

Michigan United is pleased to learn that local attorney Lawrence Garcia has been nominated for the important post of corporation counsel.

Garcia has been an important voice in the Latino community for many years. He has shown great leadership as past president of the Michigan Hispanic Bar Association and has been an advocate on important civil rights issues. Garcia has spoken out for just immigration reform and against abuses such as immigration raids at schools. He and his firm have often volunteered as civil rights monitors at the polls in Southwest Detroit, ensuring that all members of the community are able to exercise their right to vote.  He also has the strong legal background and good values that this position demands.

Mayor Duggan has made a wise choice and Lawrence Garcia will make an able public servant.

Detroiters pray for release from Marathon refinery pollution

Vigil held in hope that God touch the heart of CEO to treat residents fairly

Under blustery, grey skies Thursday evening, the faithful gathered outside the Marathon Petroleum Corporation refinery in Southwest Detroit to pray for a release for those who live in the polluted conditions around the plant. As the chimney stacks of the coker belched smoke and flames that filled the night sky, area clergy delivered a message similar to Moses’: Let my people go.

“Opening my windows when it is warm outside is not an option for me,“ said lifetime resident John Atkins. “The refinery air smells horrible.  Marathon should buy my home so I can enjoy the rest of my years.“

In 2012, the refinery underwent a $2.2 billion expansion. Marathon purchased the homes in the predominantly white neighborhood of Oakwood Heights. But despite the cries of the people, the corporation has refused to treat their black neighbors as fairly as they did their white neighbors.

Emma Lockridge, the Michigan United environmental justice organizer that spearheaded the vigil, almost didn’t go, having struggled all week with breathing issues. Lockridge went to the doctor with respiratory distress after filming a flaring incident at the refinery.

During the prayers, residents held white crosses that said ‘Exodus’ on the front with the names of friends and family impacted by the air pollution on the back. “We pray Marathon CEO Gary R. Heminger will act in a just manner and purchase our homes,“ Lockridge said. “It would be the righteous thing to do.“

Flint residents speak out against court ruling on municipal water contract

Federal Judge advances contract over objections of city council

U.S. District Judge David Lawson ruled Friday that a 30 year contract with the Great Lakes Water Authority can go forward over the objections of the Flint city council. Many residents are understandably skeptical of the deal and resent the loss of autonomy of their elected officials.

“Forcing decisions onto the city government is exactly how the Flint Water crisis started!” said Michigan United activist Carly Hammond at a press conference Tuesday outside City Hall. “This contract was negotiated with the state’s best interests in mind, not the city of Flint and certainly not the residents.”

Lead leached into Flint’s municipal water supply in 2014 after a state appointed Emergency Manager ordered that the city switch from Detroit water system to the caustic Flint River in order to save money over the objections of the city council. State officials ignored residents complaints for years before the problem was documented. During that time, scores of people were also infected by the Legionella bacteria. Twelve of them died.

“We want the State and Federal Government to release Flint from the grasp of officials who have no incentive to treat the residents of Flint fairly.” Said Megan Kreger. “If we had been able to maintain authority over our own governance, thousands would not have been poisoned, and hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars wouldn’t have been allocated to fix pipes.”