Category Archives: Childcare

Michigan United announces launch of Universal Family Care campaign at Capitol Day

Rep. Jon Hoadley presents Long Term Care Study bill to lay groundwork to support families

With new chapters springing up around the state, Michigan United and the Michigan People’s Campaign welcomed record numbers at their annual Capitol Day Event Tuesday in Lansing. The grassroots organizations scheduled dozens of meetings with state representatives and senators to discuss immigration, the environment and family care.

At a rally held at Central United Methodist Church, they announced plans to work with Caring Across Generations and other coalition partners, holding listening sessions over the summer to build out policy details this fall that will ensure the care of all Michigan family members and to help those who care for them. Benchmarks include:

  • Universal childcare up to age 4
  • Long term in home care for seniors
  • Protections for home care workers
  • A stipend for stay at home family caregivers
  • Paid family leave for workers who need time off to care for loved ones.

Many families are in the “sandwich generation:” providing care for young children at the same time they’re providing care for their parents. Sandwich generation families deal with two unaffordable systems, where the people who require care have significant and rapidly changing needs.

Michelle George, an advanced practice registered nurse is one such person. She has a 97 year old aunt with two broken hips. Although she has good health insurance, she won’t be eligible for a new wheelchair to help her get to much needed appointments. “Many families are stretched thin, have to cut back on work, or quit a job to care for aging family members.” said George. “We need better solutions, and the time is now for us to research and fight for them.

Rep. Jon Hoadley also announced that he would introduce his Long Term Care Study bill later that afternoon as the first step in this campaign.

Parents push Kalamazoo school board to take new approach to bullying, discipline

Groups call for end of segregation and medication

Social Economic and Educational Change (SEE Change), a parent advocate group affiliated with Michigan United and Justice Against Bullying at School (JABS) attended Thursday’s Kalamazoo public school board meeting to express concerns about students bullying their children and staff using excessive force to physically restrain them, resulting in cuts, bruises, muscle strains and in one case, a concussion.  

Parents were also concern about the use of alternative schools to segregate minority students and the excessive medication of students with disabilities. Earl Moore described how he saw his son’s behavior change after being bullied. Rather than dealing with the bullying, the school responded to the behavior change with physical restraint. Ultimately, his son was suspended from school for more 30 days.  “The school refused to allow my son to come back to school unless he took medication” Moore said. Kalamazoo keeps records of its students in a School Wide Information System (SWIS) Moore said the SWIS report on his son describes his behavior in criminal terms, a characterization that will follow him wherever he goes.

Gwendolyn Hooker told the school board how her granddaughter, Justyce suffered  multiple brutal attacks. She said the district showed a lack of concern in addressing the issue of bullying and how it affected students like Justyce.

Tammie Woods  spoke of her son’s battles with depression and anxiety after multiple restraints resulted in a concussion, cuts, and his arm being twisted. Woods described the Specific Learning Disabilities reading program (SLD Read) at Western Michigan University where she sought help for her son. Woods feels Kalamazoo school should provide since her child does not qualify for SLD Read services.

George White, lead advocate with SEE Change said bullying and the effects of bullying can lead to depression, withdrawal, low self esteem, poor grades, poor peer relationships, increases the dropout ratio and in rare cases can lead to death. White also commented on the need for the Restorative Justice models gaining traction all around the country in addressing student bullying. White also recommended Trauma Informed Care practices in classrooms to improve student, parent, teacher relationships.  

White said SEE Change will return to each school board meeting with more parents until they get the results that the parents seek. SEE Change plans further conversations in the community about policy reform needed to reduce bullying, expulsions, suspensions, restraint and medication dependence. The goal is to return all children to mainstream classrooms.

School board member, Lauren Freedman expressed an interest in working with SEE Change to resolve some of the issues. Dr. Rice also indicated a willingness to meet with the group.  

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Parents take over Michigan House Speaker’s office to demand childcare

State just days away from losing $20 million in federal matching funds

Parents and their children stood their ground this afternoon as they demanded that Michigan’s Speaker of the House, Kevin Cotter put childcare funding on the agenda before it’s too late. Michigan stands to lose out on $20.5 million in federal matching funds if they fail to come up with qualifying plan of their own. The deadline is September 30th and Speaker Cotter has not yet responded to calls to address the issue in the days remaining in this session.

Parents took over Speaker Cotter’s office for a colorful demonstration featuring their kids’ stuffed animals and readings from childrens books.

Kiava Stewart, mother of 2 from Detroit asks to meet with Speaker Cotter to discuss the need for childcare assistance in Michigan
Kiava Stewart, mother of 2 from Detroit asks to meet with Speaker Cotter to discuss the need for childcare assistance in Michigan

“Our families are really suffering from the high cost of child care. Speaker Cotter is about to let $20 million that could help us slip through his fingers.”  said Kiava Stewart, a mother of two from Detroit “Our kids should be his top priority.”

The parents were organized by Michigan United, a progressive, statewide group that recently took part in a national conference on childcare held in Lansing. They pointed to a report issued by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) that shows fewer and fewer children in Michigan are getting child care assistance through federal Child Care and Development Block Grants (CCDBG). Today, only one in five children eligible for child care assistance in Michigan gets any help. Latino, Asian and American Indian/Alaska Native children are even less likely to receive child care assistance.

“It’s inconceivable how our lawmakers continue to let this money slip through their fingers year after year when there are so many families who need this help right now.” said Amber York, who is also a mother of two from Detroit.  “Time is short. They need to step up right now and show their commitment to improving outcomes our kids.”

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