Tag Archives: deportation

New Christian, Muslim Coalition Launches with March

Coalition to focus on American traditions of diversity and religious freedom
Faith leaders and congregants from local Christian and Muslim communities took to the streets Sunday in a display of unity to uplift basic human dignity and counter recent attacks on refugees, Muslims and immigrants. “Neighbors Building Bridges” launched its campaign for interfaith and intercultural understanding with a march that began in Southwest Detroit at St. Gabriel’s Church, included the American Muslim Society in East Dearborn and ended at UAW Local 600.

Mario Hernandez hero“The Muslims of East Dearborn and the Christians of Southwest Detroit are neighbors who face many of the same challenges since the presidential election,” said Mario Hernandez, an immigrant parent fighting to stop his deportation. “But, working together with like-minded allies, we can strengthen our communities and work to overcome the racism and xenophobia that are ever present. We are people of faith who want to keep immigrant families like mine together and we see our adherence to faith as a way to combat bigotry and prejudice.”

The group, made of many people from different faiths and backgrounds, sees itself as being rooted in the great American traditions of diversity and religious freedom.

“When we look at the diversity of the people who make up our communities, we should be reminded that this nation was founded by immigrants many of whom were seeking the right to worship without persecution,” said Khalid Turaani, President of the American Muslim Leadership Council. “We are following the examples set in our respective faith traditions of welcoming the stranger and providing a place of refuge for those in need. It just so happens those are core American values as well. We want to be clear that refugees, immigrants and people of all faiths are welcome here.”
NBB 5
Photo courtesy Chloe Michaels

Michigan community organizations push back against Sessions’ appointment

Too racist to be Federal judge, certainly too  racist to be Attorney General

Detroit city council members stood with Michigan civil rights organizations to oppose President elect, Donald Trump’s appointment of Jeff Sessions as US Attorney General. Janee Ayers, one of the city’s two at large representatives, and Brenda Jones, the council President joined the chorus of voices calling for a more moderate choice. “We’re talking about is a dangerous person.” Said Ayers. “The Civil rights act, sanctuary cities, criminal justice reform. These are all things that any one of us could have to deal with at any given time… We are all human beings who have had somebody come before us who fought so we could have inalienable rights. Now those rights are under attack.”

Hear and download audio from the press conference

Sessions, the Junior US Senator from Alabama, has been a staunch opponent of immigrant rights. His bid for a Federal Judgeship ended amid controversy over reported racist statements. He’s also referred to groups such as the Southern Poverty Law Center and the American Civil Liberties Union as “un-American”. Add to this President elect, Donald Trump has called for unconstitutional policing tactics such as “stop and frisk”, the use of “waterboarding and much worse” and that American citizens could be sent to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and held without charge.

“Donald Trump staged a very divisive campaign to be elected President” said Bishop Herman Starks of Michigan United’s Detroit Pastoral Alliance for Change. “If he hopes to heal the nation, he’s going about it all wrong.”

Starks focused on the effect Sessions would have on voting rights going forward. As Alabama Attorney General, Sessions pursued bogus voter fraud cases against African Americans. “In the post- Voting Rights era, this is not the person to put in charge of protecting minority rights.” said Starks “The next AG must have a respect for civil rights and equal protection under the law.”

Michigan groups vow to fight crackdown on immigrants, minorities

By Detroit Free Press November 15, 2016

Michigan United joins a strong roster of service and faith organizations at the Central United Methodist Church in Detroit, to begin the work of advocacy under the new paradigm that Tuesday’s election has brought to the community.

A wide range of civil rights, community and religious leaders in metro Detroit announced today they will work to defend the rights of immigrants and minorities under the presidency of Donald Trump through a series of programs and efforts that include legal action, sanctuary houses of worship and possibly civil disobedience.

Speaking in one of Detroit’s oldest Protestant congregations, Central United Methodist Church, the groups also gathered to express solidarity with Latino students at Royal Oak Middle School who were taunted last week by chants of “Build the Wall,” which Trump often used during the campaign.

Alicia Ramon, the mother of the Latina student who recorded the chants, called for an end to racism, saying that Latino, African-American and Asian-American students at Royal Oak Middle School have been subjected to repeated hate incidents over the past year. Minority students have had to deal with racist insults against them, including one once made over the intercom system, she said.

“Racism, bigotry is unacceptable in our country, in our state, in our schools” said Ryan Bates, who leads Michigan United, an advocacy group. “This country is beautiful because we are a multicultural democracy. No one should come first. No one should come last because of what color they are, when your family came here, or how they pray.”

Bates also called for resistance to Trump’s plans to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

“Mass deportations and roundups that can break apart families are inhumane, un-American, a moral monstrosity and an economic calamity,” Bates said. “And we are going to fight it every inch of the way.”

“We are going to resist the deportations. We are going to fight for our communities.”

►Related: Trump presidency sparks anxiety among minorities in Michigan
►Related: Protesters in Royal Oak march against Trump and bigotry
►Related: Canton police officer suspended for allegedly using racial slur

About 100 people joined Bates on stage at the Detroit church near Comerica Park, which is known for its history of activism. They included advocates with the ACLU, National Lawyers Guild, ACCESS (formerly the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services), the UAW, and the Michigan branch of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

The gathering came amid an upswing in hate crimes since Trump’s election victory. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there have been more than 200 hate incidents since then. In Michigan, there are reports on social media and from advocates of Muslim Americans and Indian Americans being attacked, including a Muslim woman in Ann Arbor last week police said was threatened by a man who said he would set her on fire unless she took off her hijab. On Monday, the FBI released statistics that showed that hate crimes against Muslims in the U.S. jumped 67%, to their highest amount since 2001, when the Sept. 11 attacks happened.

Cindy Estrada, a vice president with the UAW, called for fighting bias, and also fighting for economic justice, saying the election results are a sign many are unhappy with the economic status quo. She said she’s heard about some students getting excited that Trump’s win will lead to deportation of immigrants.

“There is so much fear among children,” said Estrada.

Estrada said labor and other organizers need to transform the fear into action.

“How do we take that anger and sadness and fear and really turn it into action,” Estrada said. “This is an opportunity for us to engage again, and to make sure we change this country so that all children have a home … are welcome.”

At the same time, Estrada expressed sympathy for Trump voters.

“There are so many people out there that voted for Donald Trump because they’re tired of the status quo,” Estrada said. “And we just got to talk to those people, and educate them and help them understand … focus on the real issues and not turn against each other.”

“We have to hold our leaders accountable,” Estrada said, praising Bernie Sanders. “The system we live in right now, it doesn’t work for our country. .. When  1% owns 50% of our cumulative wealth, we need to take our country back.”

But, she added, “we don’t have to fight hate with hate … it’s about fighting hate with love.”

►Related: Black EMU students face expulsion for sit-in over racist graffiti
►Related: Hundreds show up at EMU rally to protest racism
►Related: Reward doubled after more racist graffiti found at Eastern Michigan

 Ramon, the mother of the student who recorded the “Build the wall” chants, said “hate and racism should not be tolerated and should not be accepted.” Ramon said the chants last week were the latest in a string of racist incidents at the Royal Oak school targeting minority students. “Our kids deserve to feel safe, and it’s our responsibility and our obligation to make sure that they are,” she said.
Ramon said she wants to work with “the school in helping to create a dialogue and a change, so that this message can go to communities across America … we can make a change and be that change we need to see in our communities.”

In an e-mail sent late Friday to the Free Press about the chants, Royal Oak District Superintendent Shawn Lewis-Lakin said that “staff responded when the incident occurred.  Adults not pictured in the video directed the group of students, who were saying ‘Build the wall,’ to stop.”

The Rev. Ed Rowe, previous pastor at Central United, and current cochair of Methodist Federation for Social Action, called upon houses of worship to be sanctuaries that can accept undocumented immigrants who need protection from deportation.

“Open up the sanctuary,” Rowe said, for those “whose very lives are in danger.”

“Resist evil and oppression,” Rowe said of Trump’s proposals.

Sergio Martinez, an undocumented immigrant who spoke in the church, said he was initially nervous about Trump’s win, but is heartened by the support of many in Detroit.

Nadia Tonova, the director of the National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC), a project of ACCESS, said that Arab Americans will not “hide in the shadows” under a Trump presidency.

“This is our country, too. … We are fully Americans.”

Bates also spoke up for those who might get their health insurance benefits cut under plans to rescind the Affordable Care Act, often known as Obamacare. He said his newborn baby was born premature, which many times used to lead to health insurance companies cutting health benefits.

“We fought like hell for him for four months in the hospital,” said Bates, his baby on stage held by his wife. “We’re going to fight like hell for years in the halls of Congress.”

Imam Mohammad Elahi, religious leader of the Islamic House of Wisdom of Dearborn Heights, called for an end to extremism, ending the program with a prayer.

Immigration groups unite over deportation fears

By Guy Gordon
WDIV Detroit November 14, 2016

Organizations gather to condemn racist attacks

DETROIT – Nearly 20 civil rights and Faith based organizations are coming together to condemn recent racist attacks on immigrants and vowing to act on behalf of undocumented immigrants.

The organizations involved said they’ve fielded calls from residents fearing backlash following last week’s presidential election and worried about what they believe will be mass deportations in the future.

Sergio Martinez is one of an estimated 100,00-150,000 immigrants in Michigan illegally. He fears his days as a Detroiter are numbered.

“We are not about violence,” Martinez said. “I’m not about looting, but we will do everything we can to protect our families.”

President-elect Donald Trump vowed to bring stronger immigration enforcement, starting with people who are in the country illegally and who have criminal records.

“Gang members, drug dealers, a lot of these people, 2 maybe 3 million people,” Trump said. “We are getting them out of our country.”

Immigrants rights organizations doubt it is only a purge on criminals.

“We reject the notion you can slice and dice the community into good immigrants and bad immigrants,” Randy Bates, of Michigan United, said.

They are seeking congregations willing to provide sanctuary to immigrant families in threat of deportation, and volunteer attorneys to defend them.

“We are getting calls, emails from lawyers, law students, college students, nuns, imams, pastors and hundreds of others who are saying this is not what America is about, and we are here to help you,” Ruby Robinson, of the Michigan Immigrants Rights Center, said.

An incident in a Royal Oak Middle School lunch room and an attack on an Ann Arbor woman over the weekend are leaving legal immigrants fearful.

“There’s no place for racism, especially in our schools,” Alicia Ramone said.

Immigrants hope Trump will put his words of reconciliation over the weekend into action, but they are taking action of their own. They are planning a “know your rights” town hall for the immigrant community this weekend.

Anyone who is concerned about being in danger of deportation, wants to learn their rights or find out more about the recruitment of attorneys can click here to learn more.

 

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Community groups unite after string of racial incidents post-election

By: Hannah Saunders
Fox 2 Detroit November 14, 2016

The community is rising up against a string of racist incidents, happening days following the presidential election.

Activists and community minority groups are rising up against a string of racist incidents, happening days following the presidential election.

“Last week a Muslim woman at the University of Michigan was approached by a white man, he told her ‘Take off your hijab or I’ll let you on fire,'”said Ryan Bates, Michigan United.

One man, South Asian, found a swastika on his door and the words “Trump: make America great again.”

Community groups unite after string of racial incidents post-election

Then there was the video taken last week in the Royal Oak Middle School cafeteria, a group of students chanting “build the wall”  The mother of the Hispanic student who took the now viral video, say the students who started the chant, passed notes to the Hispanic students, letting them know what time the chanting would start.

“She sent me the text message with the video and crying emojis saying ‘I’m scared,’ said Alicia Ramon.

Michigan United, the UAW, access and others joined together Monday for the press conference.  More than a dozen civil rights and faith groups stood together at Central United Methodist church, vowing to work together against racism, and keep families safe for years to come.

Among those facing prejudice and tension, Michigan United estimates there are between 100,000-150,000 undocumented immigrants in Michigan alone.

“The biggest thing I want for my community immediately is to let them know that they should not be scared,” said Sergio Martinez of Michigan United. “If they are scared, we meet at churches so they can discuss their rights.”

All these people share the common goal to stop the tension before there’s more violence.

Ramon, at first, was scared for her daughter’s safety, when she posted the video.

“She felt like she was maybe not doing the right thing,” Ramon said. “She was afraid when she did it. But she knew she had to do that and she had to show people what was going on.”

Michigan United and other groups plan on holding more events like this until the tension eases.

Many Michigan undocumented immigrants’ hopes dashed by Supreme Court decision

Advocates for undocumented immigrants say a Supreme Court decision hurts millions of families in the U.S.

In a tie vote, the Supreme Court let stand a lower court ruling that blocked the president’s executive order on immigration.

President Obama wanted to stop deportations of undocumented parents with legal resident children.

Attorney Ruby Robinson is with the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center. Robinson says undocumented residents of the U.S. live with tremendous day-to-day insecurity and fear.

“Every day when that (undocumented) parent goes to work or the child goes to school, there is no guarantee that the parent will be in the house when that child returns,” says Robinson.

And he says everyone, not just immigrants, stood to gain from the executive order.

“We don’t want children to grow up in the United States without parents, we don’t want them to be reliant on social services safety nets if a parent is deported. We want families to be together,” he says.

Robinson says there are about 60,ooo undocumented parents in Michigan who would have benefited from the president’s order.

He hopes the case comes before the Supreme Court again next year, after a ninth justice will be appointed.

Immigrant Rights Leaders: Tied Supreme Court Decision Means We Head to the Polls

Vacancy on bench allows decision to be revisited when court at full strength

On a press call in response to the Supreme Court’s tied decision in the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) case, Michigan immigration reform leaders urged the community to head to the polls in November. The decision in the case of USA v. Texas addressed President Obama’s DAPA program which would have granted protection from deportation and a work permit to up to five million undocumented parents of US citizen children. it is estimated that as many as fifty thousand of those parents live in Michigan. Today’s decision was on an injunction halting the program, not the legality of the program itself.

Download selected audio from the press conference here

“The Court’s tie decision leaves the door open for the Supreme Court to come back to this case and enact deportation relief that would keep families intact,” said Adonis Flores of Michigan United. “But that can only happen if voters make it clear that we want and need a Supreme Court justice that values all families, including immigrant families, and will recognize deportation relief as crucial for millions across the nation. We have to mobilize to make that happen.”

The current vacancy on the Supreme Court has created a unique situation that made this tie decision possible. Consequently, the court could revisit the program when a new justice is appointed.

“We’re going to fight for our families, and that means mobilizing every voter we can this summer and fall. We need to send a strong message to the next President and win a pro-immigrant Supreme Court,” said Nadia Tonova, director of the National Network for Arab American Communities. “This summer you’re going to see undocumented families register voters, knock on doors, and get out the vote. Even if you can’t vote, you can still organize.”

Organizers promised to contact at least thirty thousand Arab , Asian, and Latino American voters this summer and fall as part of a coordinated civic engagement effort.

Participants promoted the following public events regarding DAPA and the civic engagement push:

  • Friday, June 24, 12 p.m., Michigan State Capitol, Lansing, MI
    Vigil with the Mid-Michigan Immigration Coalition & Greater Lansing Network against War and Injustice
  • Tuesday, June 28, 6:30-8 p.m., Town Hall Meeting – Now What? Next Steps for Immigration
    Michigan United Kalamazoo, 1009 E. Stockbridge, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Saturday, July 9, 10 a.m., St. Francis of Assisi Parish Hall, 4405 Wesson, Detroit, MI
    Town Hall Meeting for Immigrant Families on the Consequences of the DAPA Decision
  • Saturday, July 16, 10 a.m., Immigrant Citizens Voting Power Door-to-Door Canvass
    Michigan United Detroit, 4405 Wesson, Detroit, MI
    Michigan United Kalamazoo, 1009 E. Stockbridge, Kalamazoo, MI

STOP the Deportation of Tonin Brushtulli

Call Detroit ICE Field Director, Rebecca Adducci 313-568-6036

Tonin Brushtulli is a loving husband and father. He is the sole caregiver for his wife, Katrina who has gastroparesis, a rare medical condition that has no treatment and his stepson Ilir, a disabled U.S. veteran. Tonin has been the father he never had, giving him and his mother the love and support that they need in these trying times.

But Tonin is scheduled to be deported to Albania on June 15th, days after Memorial day and just before Father’s Day. If he’s torn from his family, neither his wife or son will have anyone to take care of them once he’s gone. The only chance their family has is for ICE Director, Rebecca Adducci to use her discretion and stop his deportation to keep the family together.

They need your help now! Call Detroit Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director, Rebecca Adducci. Ask her to “Use her prosecutorial discretion to STOP the Deportation of Tonin Brushtulli.” They will want to know his Alien Number.  It is 098 518 649.

This veteran’s family deserves Adducci’s respect and gratitude. Tell her to honor Ilir’s sacrifice to this country and let them stay together.

Supreme Court to hear DAPA immigration case in spring, while Justice Scalia’s death raises concern

By , WXMI Fox17 Grand Rapids, February 15, 2016


GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. – A heated debate continues to unfold across the country about how to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Meanwhile, critical and controversial cases hang in the balance until that debate is settled.

One key immigration affected deals with President Obama’s executive order on immigration. The DAPA case, or deferred action for parents of Americans and lawful permanent residents, is scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court this spring. However, with Scalia’s death it is uncertain as to how the high court will handle this case.

Monday families and community leaders rallied at the Hispanic Center of West Michigan and called for support of DAPA. If enacted, DAPA would defer the deportations of up to five million undocumented parents, granting them work permits.

It is immigration reform that would change the lives of high school student Karla Padilla and her mother.

“It’s really scary because you never know when it’s the last time you’re going to see your mom or your parents,” said Padilla.

Unlike her brother who was born in the United States, Padilla came to the country with her mother when she was five-years-old; but she only remembers this country as her own.

“This is my home, this is where I grew up,” said Padilla. “All the memories I have, I don’t remember a lot of stuff when I was in Mexico because I was really little. So I consider myself an American.”

Introduced in 2014, the Texas Attorney General quickly challenged DAPA in federal court, which then went to a court of appeals: both federal courts found DAPA to be unconstitutional. Just last month the Supreme Court said it would hear the case this spring, and decide whether President Obama overstepped his presidential powers.

With the death of Scalia, Calvin College American Politics Professor Doug Koopman said that could change.

“If the Supreme Court does not hear, or does not rule, or has a 4-4 decision, that lower court decision stands,” said Koopman. “Therefore, at least in that jurisdiction of the United States, that DAPA will not be enforced, it will not be enforced the way President Obama wants it to be.”

In the past, presidents’ Supreme Court justice nominations have been approved more often than not in an election year. However, Koopman does not believe Scalia’s seat will be filled this year.

“This year is a particularly partisan year and this is a particularly important justice: Scalia really was the advocate for the conservative or the original or the texturalist side of things,” said Koopman.

“His replacement will tip the balance of the court. It’s such a high stakes issues, it’s doubtful that it will be filled this year.”

As we wait for the high court’s move on this case, leaders call on communities for greater support of DAPA and to come out and vote in this critical election year.

“Folks have to still be very supportive of DACA and DAPA and to meet with their representatives,” said Roberto Torres, Hispanic Center of West Michigan executive director. “It’s not just the right thing to do, it’s the American thing to do.”

Local families waiting for immigration ruling

Several families in West Michigan are waiting for a Supreme Court decision on immigration.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WZZM) — There are many families in West Michigan waiting for the outcome of a Supreme Court case on immigration.

A number of those families attended a Monday news conference regarding this case, hosted by the Hispanic Center of West Michigan.

In 2014, President Obama issued an executive order that defers the deportation of millions of undocumented immigrants. This spring, the high court is hearing a challenge to that order.

“What I really hope for is just give me a road,” said Kevin Curiel at the news conference. “Give me a list to check, and I’ll do it all to make sure I get residency. And I have no problem proving to them I am worth being here, and I can do good in this country.”

The Supreme Court is expected to rule on this case before the end of June.